Testimonials
Hear directly from individuals within our community as they share their stories, perspectives, and insights. Through their voices, we gain a deeper understanding of their experiences, challenges, and triumphs, fostering empathy and connection.
Our Community Voices
Carol Haw
Volunteer
Carol Haw, who is a single mother, is a dedicated volunteer of 10 years, tirelessly contributing her culinary skills to all three homes under Shelter's care. Her commitment extends beyond mere cooking; she plays a crucial role in supporting Shelter's financial well-being and stepping in during staff shortages.
Dato Kevin
Donor
Upon his initial visit to Shelter 1, Dato Kevin was deeply moved by the children's circumstances and decided to embark on a meaningful journey with the organization. Over the years, he has consistently supported Shelter's initiatives, including the annual purchase of desktop calendars to raise funds for the children's educational needs.
talisha
Volunteer
I'm proud to say volunteering at Shelter has been one of my greatest achievements. I have had a lot of fun engaging in activities with the children, including things like sports, charity events, and performing arts.
Tan Cheng Yi
Child Dev Specialist
Growing up in a church in Petaling Jaya in the 80s and 90s, I have come to know individuals who grew up under the care of Shelter Home personally. These individuals whom I had the privilege of befriending also went to my secondary school.
David Shammah
Care Giver
My parents were called into the caring ministry nearly 35 years ago. They have nurtured hundreds of children. I grew up with them and realised that I would need to take the baton from them and nurture this generation with moral education and growth.
Sister Jerusha
Volunteer
It all began at the age of 16, when I first discovered my true calling in child ministry. Today, it is my 19th year of both challenging and an incredibly rewarding journey of working at care homes.
Grace Kong
Shelter Home Counselor
My Journey at Shelter Home For Children - Since November 2019, I have been serving as a registered and licensed counsellor at Shelter Home For Children. This journey, filled with both challenges and fulfilment, has been nothing short of transformative. I’ve had the privilege of working closely with our resilient young residents, providing emotional support, guidance, and a safe space for healing.
saras
Community
For most girls, life at 18 means college and friends but not for Saras (not her real name). At 18 she has a child and lives with her husband Vijayakumar, his aged parents and 2 of his younger siblings aged 12 and 8.
madam alice
Community
Madam Alice (not her real name) 60, lost her husband after a prolonged illness. Left with no property and no income she and her daughter Lily, 15 continue to live in a dilapidated shack in the Sentul squatter area which is home to them.
Carol Haw
Volunteer
Carol Haw, who is a single mother, is a dedicated volunteer of 10 years, tirelessly contributing her culinary skills to all three homes under Shelter's care. Her commitment extends beyond mere cooking; she plays a crucial role in supporting Shelter's financial well-being and stepping in during staff shortages. Carol's passion for helping shines through in the delicious meals she prepares, filling the children's stomachs and introducing them to various foods.

Despite the children being at school when she delivers the meals, Carol believes in the significance of her actions, which bring joy to the children. Her dedication is evident on the day of cooking; she starts at 6 am to cook an array of 5-6 items and delivers food to the home by 10 am.

Carol's daughter, Priscilla, joins in to assist and contribute creative ideas to enhance the culinary experience for the children. At times they refer to recipe books for inspiration, exploring new items to add to the menu. In times when Carol is unable to personally cook, she generously substitutes with pastries, spending around RM200. Remarkably, this initiative has led to the pastry shop donating additional items for the children, creating a collaborative effort to support Shelter's mission of providing a nurturing environment for these young souls.
Dato Kevin
Donor

Upon his initial visit to Shelter 1, Dato Kevin was deeply moved by the children's circumstances and decided to embark on a meaningful journey with the organization. Over the years, he has consistently supported Shelter's initiatives, including the annual purchase of desktop calendars to raise funds for the children's educational needs. Recognizing the ongoing operational requirements of the shelter, Dato Kevin regularly extends additional donations.

In 2023, Dato Kevin expressed a special interest in meeting all the children and visited the Shelter with his family, generously bestowing significant ang pow to both the children and staff. Acknowledging the unique needs of the teenage girls in the OUG home, he delegated his secretary, Ms. Jean, to assess their specific requirements. Upon learning about maintenance needs, Dato Kevin promptly fulfilled them.

During the visit, it came to his attention that a young girl, having completed SPM, eagerly sought sponsorship for her college education. Unfortunately, her previous attempts were unsuccessful. In a compassionate gesture, Dato Kevin assured the girl of his full support, covering her foundation course expenses, including lodging and cost of living. Currently enrolled in a creative multimedia foundational course at MMU University, she is now empowered to pursue her educational aspirations, thanks to Dato Kevin's unwavering support.

Talisha
Volunteer

I'm proud to say volunteering at Shelter has been one of my greatest achievements. I have had a lot of fun engaging in activities with the children, including things like sports, charity events, and performing arts. I've come to enjoy teaching the children performing arts the most. Through the different projects we've done, I've been able to witness the growth, teamwork, and creativity the children have to offer and I am delighted with how much they enjoy each project. Initially I only planned to volunteer for 6 months, but after this experience I think I'll stay for as long as I can. 

Tan Cheng Yi
Child Dev Specialist
Growing up in a church in Petaling Jaya in the 80s and 90s, I have come to know individuals who grew up under the care of Shelter Home personally. These individuals whom I had the privilege of befriending also went to my secondary school. One of them, has married one of our contemporaries and has built a family together.

Later, when I graduated from secondary school and got a temporary job as a relief teacher, I encountered other children from Shelter Home studying at the school where I taught. They became my students. Through that experience, I came to understand the challenges these students faced. For example, they may miss a lot of school and fall behind in their studies, or they may experience long-term emotional distress. Most children would have parents who would cart them up and down for tuition and be available to comfort, shield, or defend them from as many hardships as possible. But the children from Shelter are denied this privilege. Consequently, they have higher risks of falling out of school or developing psychological problems. The work of Shelter Home to protect, heal, and nurture these young lives is invaluable.

Now in my 40s, and as a child development specialist, I have again had the privilege of getting involved with the work of Shelter in the capacity of a Sunday School teacher and devotion volunteer. They come to Sunday School faithfully and are sometimes better behaved than some other children. This is a testimony to the good work and discipline instilled in the children. Not only are they enthusiastic to learn the songs and biblical values we impart, they are often a joy-giver to so many of the teachers and helpers.

Of course, there are the few that exhibit difficulties with social or emotional control and have learning challenges. I have witnessed how the managers make their best effort to provide for the children’s unique needs. They arrange personal tutors, counsellors, doctors, therapists, and psychologists so that the children’s very complex needs are addressed.

This brings me to the caregivers. Witnessing firsthand the dedication and sacrifices of the staff made me sometimes wonder if I have what it takes to be one of them. I concluded that it takes considerable humility, courage, durability, and faith. With that, I praise God for raising these individuals to fulfil this caregiving role. But surely, they also need rest, refreshment, and rejuvenation. Hence, their continuous need to partner with the community from time-to-time spurs me on to lend a hand. Even if my role in channelling others to volunteer for various roles is small, I believe each one can play a small part to make a bigger difference.

I thank God for Shelter Home, for the many lessons I have learned throughout my life, and for the children whom they have sheltered. May God continue to bless the work and multiply it for His kingdom and glory.
David Shammah
Care Giver

My parents were called into the caring ministry nearly 35 years ago. They have nurtured hundreds of children. I grew up with them and realised that I would need to take the baton from them and nurture this generation with moral education and growth.

Words matter. The change of one simple word in a phrase can make all the difference.

Words convey a message, which is why it is so important for us to consider the difference between “ ministry to/for the underprivilidged”, and “ ministry with the underprivilidged.” The change of a single word makes ministry look different.

At its most basic, one form of ministry is a hand out and the other is a hand up. One form of ministry is hands-off, and the other is relational. One form of ministry will help someone out, and the other will transform lives.

In this ministry I learn to walk in their shoes of the heart broken and the poor. As we help to transform their lives, our lives are transformed too. It’s about vulnerability. It’s about humility. It’s about partnership.

Caregiving can be physically, psychologically, financially, and socially straining. It requires being patient, attentive, compassionate, and dependable even if those I care for are difficult, or when unresolved conflicts bubbled up and roles get reversed.

I am grateful for the opportunity to nurture, mold these precious gems and make them ready for the world.

Sister Jerusha
Volunteer

It all began at the age of 16, when I first discovered my true calling in child ministry. Today, it is my 19th year of both challenging and an incredibly rewarding journey of working at care homes.

I've had the privilege of being a part of SHELTER's family for five beautiful years now. My role primarily includes taking care of the children and also assisting with various tasks around the home. Although the initial years of my journey were filled with many challenges due to the lack of guidance and support, my passion never wavered. With each passing year, I realised that I have not only learned but also honed various necessary skills to provide my best service to these young souls. One of the many aspects that makes my days at SHELTER particularly special is the unwavering kindness and support I receive from the family-like team. Their ardent guidance and administration have been essential in both my personal and professional growth.

Working with the children and for the children has become more than just a job. To me, it is a truly gratifying experience that aligns with my soul purpose. Other than taking care of the children, there is one particular thing that I consider as the pinnacle of my responsibilities. It is the ecstatic task of treating the children with special things on significant days such as festivals and birthdays. Here, we celebrate every child’s birthday with equal enthusiasm and affection.

This simple gesture gives extreme delight to not just the children but also to my own heart. Witnessing the joy on their young faces as they relish in these special moments is a profound reminder of the impact one can cause by simply incorporating a little extra love and care into their lives.

As a person who genuinely loves children and working with them, I perceive each day at SHELTER as an opportunity for me to bring a positive difference.

Grace Kong
Shelter Home Counselor
My Journey at Shelter Home For Children-

Since November 2019, I have been serving as a registered and licensed counsellor at Shelter Home For Children. This journey, filled with both challenges and fulfilment, has been nothing short of transformative. I’ve had the privilege of working closely with our resilient young residents, providing emotional support, guidance, and a safe space for healing.

My path to becoming a counsellor was driven by a deep desire to make a positive impact on the lives of vulnerable children. Each day, I witness their strength and resilience, even in the face of adversity. It’s a humbling experience—one that continually reinforces my commitment to this vital work.

Working in a shelter home is not without its challenges. Each day brings with it new situations that test my resilience, patience, and empathy. However, these challenges are what make my work at the shelter home deeply fulfilling.

At Shelter Home For Children, we prioritize creating safe and nurturing environments. Our young residents come from diverse backgrounds, each carrying their unique stories. As a counsellor, I’ve learned that trust is the cornerstone of our work. Building rapport with these children allows us to delve into their emotions, fears, and hopes.

Every conversation, every breakthrough, and every smile from the children I counsel adds a layer of meaning to my work. It’s in these moments that I realize the impact of my role - not just as a counsellor, but as a beacon of hope and stability in the lives of these children. I’ve witnessed countless moments of triumph—the first smile after a difficult counselling session, the courage to share painful memories, and the determination to overcome challenges. These moments remind me that healing is a journey, and every step matters.

One of the most profound sources of my motivation comes from an ex-resident of Shelter Home For Children. Her words, “Sister, the girls need you,” echo in my mind when I am about to give up facing the challenges ahead. This simple yet powerful statement serves as a reminder of the importance of my role and the positive influence I can have on the lives of these children.

Another thing that enables me to face my daily challenges is the statement that I hold on to that is, “nothing surprises me anymore.” This statement helps me to cope with the unpredictability and complexity of the cases that I encounter. It also reminds me to be open-minded and compassionate towards the children, and to respect their individuality and diversity.

At the Shelter Home For Children, collaboration is at the heart of our approach. We work closely with teachers, caregivers, and other professionals to ensure holistic care. Empowering our children to express themselves, cope with trauma, and develop essential life skills is our shared mission. Our team provides a range of services, including individual counselling, group therapy, and crisis intervention. We also collaborate with external agencies to offer educational workshops, vocational training, emotional quotient classes, and mental health awareness programs.

As I continue my journey at the Shelter Home For Children, I am filled with gratitude for the experiences I’ve had and the lives I’ve touched. The road ahead may be challenging, but the fulfilment that comes from making a difference in the lives of these children makes every step worth it. Let’s continue to uplift and empower our children—one counselling session, one heartfelt conversation, and one step at a time.

Thank you for joining me on this journey. Our children are resilient, and their potential knows no bounds. Together, we will continue to create a nurturing environment where healing and growth flourish.

With gratitude,
Grace Kong
Registered and Licensed Counsellor
Saras
Communuity
For most girls, life at 18 means college and friends but not for Saras (not her real name). At 18 she has a child and lives with her husband Vijayakumar, his aged parents and 2 of his younger siblings aged 12 and 8. They live in a ramshackle hut in Kampong Cahaya which has no running water, thick undergrowth and surrounded by stagnant water which is a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Water is sourced from a well nearby. Her husband Vijayakumar is an odd job worker and earns about RM300 to RM400 monthly of which RM150 goes for rental. To add to her malady neither she nor her baby, have birth certificates or any other form of identification. In fact this seems to be the common problem for most of the inhabitants of this village which consists of about six families in total. All their neighbours have left for low cost dwellings nearby but these families have been left behind because of their lack of identification papers.

SHELTER Community Services staff came to know of their plight which was highlighted in the Tamil newspaper and visited them. SHELTER has now undertaken the task of obtaining birth certificates and identification cards for all of the residents and is providing monthly food aid to 4 of the families. With this, Saras and the other families will be helped, thanks to SHELTER’s Community Services.
Madam Alice
Community
Madam Alice (not her real name) 60, lost her husband after a prolonged illness. Left with no property and no income she and her daughter Lily, 15 continue to live in a dilapidated shack in the Sentul squatter area which is home to them. They live from day to day depending on aid from neighbours and good Samaritans. At her age no one will employ her so she collects old newspapers and discarded cans to sell from which she earns a meagre RM50-RM60 per month. Her elderly brother who himself is ill sometimes extends her RM100 whenever he is able. 

She came to SHELTER for help and support for her school going daughter. SHELTER’s subsequent home visit uncovered her tragic state of living. The surrounding is a haven for drug addicts and stray dogs. It also floods whenever there’s a heavy downpour and hence the house is constantly damp and musty and teeming with mosquitoes. To add to her woes she met with an accident which has left her with a bad arm.

SHELTER has supported her with monthly food aid and occasional financial aid.
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